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Architectural Digest

archdigest

The International Design Authority.

Although it’s a qualifier many strive for, a one-of-a-kind home is rather difficult to find. Design is often derivative, and trends, as much as we like to think we’re ignoring them, are unavoidably influential. Originality doesn’t come easy. With that understanding, it feels safe to characterize curator and investor @bethredmond’s house in West Hollywood as distinctive. Much of what fills it—trippy Ivan Navarro neons, textural @estudiocampana sofas, @gregorysiff’s explosions of color, and sculptural @chrisschanck seating—is simply not replicable. Indeed, Redmond has created her own fantasy. Moving back to her native L.A. after several years in New York City, where she lived in @thegreenwichhotel, she first settled into a smaller house with “killer views” in the hills before realizing she craved something that felt more like a home. What she found, off the market—owned by a fellow art collector who hardly lived in it—was “an architecturally better house for the stuff I have inside.” Its interior wall space aside, the big-time curator was seriously drawn to its shell, too. “It’s black: I mean, that’s like a dream for me. I’m a very untraditional person, and I definitely like to make a statement,” says Redmond. Chic, modern, and rock-and-roll are how she describes it, laughing about a @wsj article that called black exteriors the new white picket fence. Redmond says she didn’t choose the achromatic exterior to be trendy, and in fact makes zero effort to conform to fads in fashion, art, or interior design. "I don’t listen to what anyone says," she says. "I don’t care who the art world says is expensive; art is not a business to me.” The house was easily adapted to Redmond’s use. She closed up some windows to create more wall space for hanging art, had extensive recessed gallery lighting installed in ceilings, and built a wall for Emin’s neon piece that says, “I followed you into the water knowing I would never return.” It lights up and reflects on the pool, alongside a yellow neon bench by Navarro. To see more of the home, visit the link in our profile. Photo by @samfroststudio; text by @katromeyn
Since 1885, when the Osborne was built, @davidgmaupin and Stefano Tonchi’s apartment had changed hands only three times, and many of the original features were still intact when they purchased it. With their friend and lead designer on the project, #AD100 architect @annabelleselldorf, they agreed to leave the Arts and Crafts details: leaded-glass windows, geometric transoms above the doors, carved moldings, ceramic-tile fireplace surrounds. They restored the parquet and retained the 14-foot ceilings in the living room. For the architect, the apartment obliged them to weigh “the merit of invention as opposed to absorbing what may already exist, for good reason.” As clients, Selldorf says, Tonchi and Maupin “feel like family. There were no differences of opinion. We had this serendipitous relationship, playing off each other’s ideas.” They shared not only a frame of reference that spans contemporary art and midcentury Italian design but also certain obsessions—the work of Gio Ponti, Venetian glass by Seguso, Venini, and Carlo Moretti. Says Maupin: “We kind of read each other’s minds and agreed.” In the kitchen, pictured here, a banquette wears a @mooreandgiles leather, and the Levaggi chairs are topped by seat cushions of @fortunyvenezia fabrics.The concrete floor tiles by @cletile. See more of the home via the link in our profile. Photo by @jasonschmidtstudio; text by @holly.brubach; styled by @michaelbargo
Chris Burch’s (@jchristopherburch) majestic 1608 hôtel particulier outside of Paris has the rare distinction of being landmarked on both the exterior and much of the interior. As such, it still possessed many of its 17th- and 18th-century floors, paneling, and beams when he purchased it. Yet it had also undergone patchy renovations over time. “We wanted to bring it right back to the way it had been,” notes Burch. The American entrepreneur tapped his friend @marcoscarani to creative direct the revamp, and French architect and decorator Michel Pinet—something of a national treasure for his masterly work restoring several of the country’s most prized monuments historiques, Château de Versailles among them. Pinet is also a specialist in the field of antique wallpapers and fabrics, many of which he and Scarani used to outfit Burch’s Senlis, France abode. To say that everything has been executed with scrupulous accuracy would be an understatement. Yet the atmosphere is relaxed. “It’s definitely not precious,” Burch says. Scarani was of the same mind-set. “Usually French is formal and uncomfortable,” he observes. “I said to Chris, ‘You want a home that looks like it’s been there forever, like you’ve lived in it.’” Burch leans toward the cozy English country look, which is expressed in furnishings you can sink into, though here, there’s not a chintz in sight. French textiles seulement. “There are no flowers,” Scarani emphasizes. Still, liberties were taken, as with the curtains of a Madeleine Castaing climbing-vine pattern that frame the breakfast room’s windows. “They’re 19th century,” Scarani says, “but so iconic of a French interior.” They’re also a nod to Burch’s daughter Louisa, a classicist with a soft spot for the late grande dame of design. The grand salon is furnished with antiques from the 18th-century chandelier and Delft ceramics to  a Louis XV console. The sofas and chairs wear Braquenié prints. Take a tour of the property through the link in our profile. Photo by @miguelfloresvianna; text by @janekeltnerdev
After landing on a Victorian-era apartment in Manhattan’s the Osborne building, @davidgmaupin and Stefano Tonchi invited their friend #AD100 architect @annabelleselldorf to help them revamp the space. The rigor and elegant restraint that have come to characterize Selldorf’s work are a far cry from the first impression made by the Osborne’s lobby—a brass, stucco, marble, Tiffany-style glass, mosaic, gold-leaf, and glazed terra-cotta phantasmagoria in the style of Aladdin. “Utterly ridiculous but totally beautiful,” Selldorf calls it—an opinion Maupin and Tonchi share. While other residents have taken their decorative cues from the building’s period references, outfitting their apartments with William Morris–style wall­paper and favrile-glass lamps, the three friends chose a different route. “The space is traditional,” Tonchi says, “but that doesn’t mean it has to be conservative.” Walls were painted white, as a backdrop for the art, in silent conversation with the furniture and fixtures. Most works are by artists from Maupin’s @lehmannmaupin gallery, with its diverse stable of talent from around the world. In the study, Gilbert & George’s Lover, a mixed-media grid printed with tabloid headlines, faces a grid of a different kind—a wall of custom @amuneal bookshelves with brass uprights and black shelves (above). The furniture is mostly midcentury modern in its lines, but, Tonchi notes, “the colors are a little off”—green, orange, and turquoise taken from the tile around the fireplaces. Some pieces are custom; others come from Vica, the company Selldorf started in 2004 to sell her own furniture. Visit the link in our profile to tour the apartment. Photo by @jasonschmidtstudio; text by @holly.brubach; styled by @michaelbargo
Both as a Grammy Award–winning musician and as a designer, @lennykravitz has crafted an extraordinarily idiosyncratic vision that fuses disparate genres, periods, styles, and influences. In the 16 years since founding @kravitz_design, he has fashioned public spaces and suites for hotels in Miami, Las Vegas, and Toronto and developed products ranging from furniture and door hardware to wallpaper and ceramic tile. But one of his most intriguing personal projects has been the ongoing reimagining of an 18th-century Brazilian coffee plantation outside Rio de Janeiro. The sprawling property encompasses a veritable village of 19th-century Portuguese colonial-style farmhouses and outbuildings, some of which Kravitz converted into guest quarters, a gym, a poolhouse, and a recording studio. He began his renovation efforts simply by lightening and brightening the existing structures. “The interiors were very old-school colonial—matching wallpaper and upholstery, and lots of heavy wood furniture. My first impulse was to clean it all up, strip the wallpaper, weed out the endless armoires, and upgrade the plumbing and electrical,” he explains. Furnishings by Brazilian masters on the order of Oscar Niemeyer, Sergio Rodrigues, and Jorge Zalszupin, along with classic Brazilian tiles and other local flourishes, pay homage to the site. In characteristically exuberant style, Kravitz added an array of midcentury furnishings—including pieces by Warren Platner and Eero Saarinen—along with custom pieces from his namesake design firm and glamorous accents such as vintage @pacorabanne wall hangings and a @kawaipianos clear-acrylic grand piano. “The pace down here is slow, so I had a chance to live with everything and see how I interact with it. There was lots of freestyling and trial and error in the decorating,” he says. In the gallery, pictured above, a pair of leather-and-walnut wingback chairs by Kravitz Design lines hallway. On the left wall is a photograph of Kravitz’s mother, actress Roxie Roker, and a Sergio Rodrigues tauari-wood bench is below.l. See more of the property through the link in our profile. Photo by @simonuptonphotos; text by @mayer.rus; styled by Kirsten Mattila
Sculptors Jean-Michel Othoniel (@othoniel_studio) and @johan_creten, who first met some 30 years ago, have dedicated their lives to art and creation. The French Othoniel has spent his career expressing himself in a variety of materials, but is best known for his works in glass, especially the pieces evoking long strings of colorful beads. Creten, a Belgian known for his work in ceramics, has also shown extensively around the world. Based in Paris with separate studios and an apartment near the Picasso Museum in the Marais, the artists decided they wanted a house to get away to—“a place,” in the words of Creten, “to think and create.” And Sète, a port city in southern France about four hours by train from Paris, was a natural choice. At first, they hoped to find a villa on the hill overlooking the port, with a garden and a pool. Instead they ended up with the exact opposite, a house down on the tightly packed waterfront. The house they bought had been built in 1840 for the family of the painter Frédéric Bazille, a friend of Monet, Degas, and Cézanne. While the bones were great, it was completely run-down, so they set off on a yearlong renovation project. Othoniel wanted to conserve the original structure and bring back the original “circulation” of the house. In renovating, the artists decided to conserve traces of the house’s many transformations over the years including a floor from the 1970s, some Art Deco elements, a couple of mirrors, the original kitchen tiles (pictured above), and all of the colored-glass elements. In the kitchen, original wall tiles show the city of Sète’s coat of arms. See more of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @simonpwatson; text by @gaygassmann; styled by Sebastian Sergeant
Fashion stylist @katie_mossman knew she was in for a challenge when she began renovation of an 1850s sea captain’s home in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, in 2014. It was small, dark, and broken up into little spaces, and she envisioned a light-filled midcentury-style house with double-height ceilings and indoor-outdoor living. “I wanted it to feel like California,” Mossman explains. She hardly anticipated, however, that it would take five years and three contractors to complete. “It was the worst nightmare,” she says. “But it’s amazing now, so I try not to think about all the bad stuff.” Indeed, as the sunlight pours into her home, which she shares with Miki, her 16-year-old Pomeranian, one is all but transported to Baja, or perhaps even the iconic ArqDonini Jungle-Beach house in Brazil—a sort of floating, clean-lined idyll—that partially inspired Mossman’s great room. The lofty space is an amalgamation of everything she loves, and the reason she bought the house in the first place. “There was a shed here, separate from the main part, and it was in total disarray,” she explains. “So I knew I could do whatever I wanted with it.” That included a floor-to-ceiling glass door that slides all the way open to the backyard, a floating concrete staircase, and a poured-concrete wall. During the renovation, Mossman developed an obsession with chairs, which she bought on 1stdibs and stockpiled in a storage unit. They now fill her living room. A pair by Ib Kofod-Larsen sit opposite a Rib Lounge Chair by Martin Eisler and Carlo Hauner for Forma Brazil. Two Eames are positioned against the back wall; an Arne Norell lounger is off to the side. “When I looked at them all together, they seemed very brown,” she recalls. So she added a big, bright painting by the artist @les_rogers. Visit the link in our bio to see more of the Brooklyn home. Photo by @maxb.photo; text by @karinnelson23
When American entrepreneur Chris Burch (@jchristopherburch) set out to restore a 1608 Hôtel Particulier outside of Paris, he and friend @marcoscarani faced the challenge of maintaining the historic home’s essence while instilling it with all the functionality of a modern one. Four exquisite hand-carved doors dating back to the 1600s that had been randomly dispersed throughout the house have been reunited in a guest bedroom. The nine bathrooms and two kitchens, which had undergone “horrible” renovations in the 1950s and ’70s, were reimagined as they might have existed 300 years ago, save for brand-new plumbing. In the main kitchen (which, Burch admits, “I haven’t stepped foot in”), Scarani and French architect and decorator Michel Pinet reproduced antique tiles and sourced ancient stone. The fabric cushioning the rustic chairs is an antique Braquenié check dating to the 1700s; Pinet had just enough in his archive to cover the eight seats. To say that everything has been executed with scrupulous accuracy would be an understatement. Yet the atmosphere is relaxed. “It’s definitely not precious,” Burch says. “That’s one thing I don’t like at all.” Scarani was of the same mind-set. “Usually French is formal and uncomfortable,” he observes. “I said to Chris, ‘You want a home that looks like it’s been there forever, like you’ve lived in it.’” See more inside the home via the link in our profile. Photo by @miguelfloresvianna; text by @janekeltnerdev
Eight years ago, when @davidgmaupin and Stefano Tonchi were expecting twin girls, they set out in search of a bigger apartment. Friends and colleagues figured they would land in one of Manhattan’s glamorous buildings famous for their design pedigree, given the couple’s standing in the worlds of art and fashion: Maupin as cofounder of the @lehmannmaupin gallery, Tonchi as the editor of @wmag. And, indeed, they considered moving to the U.N. Plaza, a beacon of Miesian modernism on the East River. In the end, however, they opted for the Osborne, a mid-rise, brownstone-clad Gilded Age mishmash of styles and materials. All the more surprising: They invited their friend #AD100 architect @annabelleselldorf to work with them (and Selldorf brought in architect @matthewschnepfarchitect, a former associate at her firm, to assist). Since 1885, when the Osborne was built, Maupin and Tonchi’s apartment had changed hands only three times, and many of the original features were still intact. With Selldorf, they agreed to leave the Arts and Crafts details: leaded-glass windows, geometric transoms above the doors, carved moldings, ceramic-tile fireplace surrounds. They restored the parquet and retained the 14-foot ceilings in the living room. For the architect, the apartment obliged them to weigh “the merit of invention as opposed to absorbing what may already exist, for good reason.” In the living room, Vica armchairs in a handwoven cork blend by Sylvie Johnson Paris frame the fireplace and a painting by David Salle hangs above. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the home. Photo by @jasonschmidtstudio; text by @holly.brubach; styled by @michaelbargo
When entrepreneur Chris Burch (@jchristopherburch) joined friends @marcoscarani, and Jamie Creel (@creelandgow) to view a majestic 1608 hôtel particulier outside of Paris that was on the market, he was immediately sold. Says Scarani, reflecting on what admittedly began as an impulse buy: “Chris is very spontaneous. It’s part of his secret to success.” The 10,000-square-foot house has the rare distinction of being landmarked on both the exterior and much of the interior, yet it had also undergone patchy renovations over time. “We wanted to bring it right back to the way it had been,” notes Burch. Scarani had spent three years tending to the interiors of Nihi, Burch’s luxury surf resort in Indonesia, and beyond that has conjured up his own sublime homes. “I never would have bought the house unless I knew he was there,” Burch admits. Scarani, who doesn’t consider himself an interior designer, describes his role as that of “creative director—I source and put the concept together.” To that end, he immediately reached out to French architect and decorator Michel Pinet, something of a national treasure for his masterly work restoring several of the country’s most prized “monuments historiques,” Château de Versailles among them. He is also a specialist in the field of antique wallpapers and fabrics, many of which he and Scarani used to outfit Burch’s abode. In Burch’s bedroom, a Braquenié cotton is used en suite, from the Michel Pinet bed to the Louis XV chaise longue. Take a tour of the property through the link in our profile. Photo by @miguelfloresvianna; text by @janekeltnerdev
When he’s not Lenny Kravitz the rock star, he’s Lenny Kravitz the farmer. Or, “fazendeiro” as he is known on the 1,000-acre Brazilian coffee plantation that Kravitz has transformed into an artistic Eden. Follow him through the farm on horseback, and inside the spectacular home via the link in our profile 🎥
American entrepreneur Chris Burch (@jchristopherburch) had long dreamed of having an apartment in Paris. He knew the precise floor plan he would inhabit in the exact building on rue de Seine. The problem was that no such place was available. “In France, if you want a beautiful apartment with a garden in the best neighborhood, you need to be patient,” says Burch’s friend @marcoscarani, who, with his partner, Jamie Creel—purveyor behind the beloved Manhattan curiosity shop @creelandgow—possesses such a unicorn dwelling. A few years ago, while Burch was visiting the couple in Paris, the three men took a day trip to Senlis, a cobblestoned village outside the city. Scarani and Creel had always been tickled by the idea of having their own pile there, and having been told by a friend that a majestic 1608 hôtel particulier was for sale, they went to see the place with Burch in tow. “It was absolutely stunning,” says Scarani, “but it was too big for us and too much work.” Burch, on the other hand, was sold. “It needed renovation; it needed everything,” he concedes. “But you could just feel it was wonderful.” As the father of six children, Burch hoped the home could one day serve as a family respite. Says Scarani, reflecting on what admittedly began as an impulse buy: “Chris is very spontaneous. It’s part of his secret to success.” The 10,000-square-foot house has the rare distinction of being landmarked on both the exterior and much of the interior. As such, it still possessed many of its 17th- and 18th-century floors, paneling, and beams. Yet it had also undergone patchy renovations over time. “We wanted to bring it right back to the way it had been,” notes Burch. Take a look inside the restored home through the link in our profile. Photo by @miguelfloresvianna; text by @janekeltnerdev

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