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Architectural Digest

archdigest

The International Design Authority.

Tucked into a sleepy T-shaped street in Park Slope (a Brooklyn neighborhood known for its stroller traffic and laid-back restaurants), Maggie Gyllenhaal (@mgyllenhaal) Peter Sarsgaard’s brownstone was an instant hit with the creative couple. The quiet block gave them Sesame Street vibes, and when they first looked at it, Gyllenhaal was pregnant with the couple’s eldest daughter. Since then, another daughter has joined the family, adding to the home’s all-over family feel. “When we walked into this house, it really felt like a home to us,” says Gyllenhaal. “The light is beautiful and the rooms feel airy because the ceilings are unusually high.” And though the pair worked with @elizabeth_roberts_architecture and designer John Erik Karkula, they’ve made the 3,600-square-foot space all their own. “We’re artists,” Gyllenhaal says, “and we want our house to feel like a place that includes art, and not just on the wall. The way different fabrics go together and the way this tile goes next to this wooden tub, and maybe it’s an unusual way of doing it, but isn’t there something kind of exquisite about it?” And about that teak tub which they spotted in a little ad in the back of a design magazine, pictured here, Sarsgaard adds, “It spoils you on all other bathtubs.” Gyllenhaal chimes in: “It’s one of my absolute favorite things about this house.” Visit the link in our profile to take a tour of their home. Photo by @gievesanderson; text by @julievadnal
Despite the setting on Lake Michigan, there are no anchors or nautical references in this  five-bedroom family home, which was recently masterminded by Chicago interior designer @karamanndesign alongside local firm Northworks Architecture. “Ashley has amazing taste and is mainly drawn to ethereal, romantic European properties,” says Mann of her client Ashley Quicksilver, who owns the Winnetka, Illinois, ready-to-wear women’s clothing boutique @athene_shop; husband Jeffrey is a private-equity executive. “We started with a classic French aesthetic and landed on something a little more toned down and restrained.” Here that meant sumptuous plaster walls, Belgian oak planked floors, and a sophisticated enfilade that puts the current trend of shared living room, dining area, and kitchen concepts to shame. “I am so over open floor plan living,” says Mann, citing that each room is a room in the traditional sense: an oak-paneled music room gives way to a white-walled living room, but each maintains a distinct character and enjoys the kind of privacy that today feels like a luxury. “There’s a beautiful formality to the house,” says Mann. “It’s new construction but it feels like it’s been there forever.” In the living room, an 18th-century mantel and mirror lend timeworn patina, and custom sofas upholstered in washed linen surround a vintage marble cocktail table by Angelo Mangiarotti. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the home. Photo by @richardpowersphoto; text by @jenfernand
As a planet, we trash 1.3 billion tons of food a year while more than 800 million people remain hungry. Italian chef @massimobottura, of three-Michelin-star restaurant Osteria Francescana, and his wife, Lara Gilmore, are trying to change that—one meal at a time—with their innovative nonprofit Food for Soul. At community kitchens or “refettorios” throughout Italy (as well as in Paris, London, and Rio de Janeiro) chefs such as @alainducasse, @chefclaresmyth, @danielboulud, and Bottura himself work with locals to prepare meals for the hungry. What’s more: The spaces have been designed by the likes of #AD100 maestro Ilse Crawford (such as the space above in London), artist @JR, and sculptor/painter Mimmo Paladino. “In a world in which so many build walls, we break walls,” explains Bottura. “We say, Welcome, come in.” Now, thanks to a grant from the @rockefellerfdn, they’re planning to bring the operation Stateside in the next year. Visit the link in our profile to discover more trailblazing projects around the world that benefit the greater good through the link in our profile. Photo by Simon Owens
When Alexi Ashe Meyers and @sethmeyers needed a quick refresh of their eight-room duplex in a redbrick prewar, they turned to Alexi’s sister, @arielashe and her partner Reinaldo Leandro (@reilean) to make it happen. “This was not your typical New York gut renovation,” Leandro says, “but rather a strategic renovation.” It took all of about three months for the duo and their #AD100 firm @ashe_leandro to complete. With laser-targeted interventions (bright white paint, cutting an archway here and there, crafting a family-friendly living-dining area), the partners utterly transformed the 3,200-square-foot space while accentuating its Manhattan aura.There’s an open flow, with rooms bathed in light, and furnishings from the duo’s recently launched line, @ruemmler_, including split-backed oak dining chairs (pictured here), a handsome oak-burl console, and pendant lighting in cinched amber silk. Bespoke detailing reveals the team’s gossamer touch—proper materials, properly handled. Consider the gorgeously milled balusters on the staircase (above) and the soft curves of the mantelpieces, done in gray Pietra Cardoso stone. The overall vibe is pared-down without being severe, tailored without being uptight. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the home. Photo by @shadedeggesphotography; text by @mrchampale; styled by @colinking
When the owners of a charming English country house—a renovated 19th-century stable not far from London—decided to add a sunny new kitchen and dining area at the rear of the redbrick building, there was little garden to see through the now expansive set of windows. “The greenhouse was insurmountable,” the husband says of the sprawling antique conservatory that stood dismayingly close to the planned extension. Still, he adds, he and his wife “couldn’t bring ourselves to destroy something so beautiful.” Debbie Roberts and Ian Smith of @acreswildgardendesign, an award-winning landscape design firm in West Sussex, had a solution. First, reduce the size of the greenhouse to a more manageable footprint; have it restored by the original manufacturer (Foster and Pearson is still in business after more than 150 years); and move it to a distant spot on the property, where its peaked roof would act as an eye-catcher. Second was to transform the outlying woodland and somewhat unrelated outdoor rooms—a few containing plants that had been collected by a long-ago owner on expeditions around the world—into an enticing stroll that also incorporated an existing swimming pool. Finally, once the greenhouse had been relocated, a series of tailored terraces of grass, sandstone, and Yorkshire walling—raised destinations linked with steps and as modern in appearance as the crisp new interiors overlooking them—would extend from the foundation of the residence, offering the kind of entertaining options that the couple had largely deferred as they raised their children. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the transformed garden. Photo by @MarianneMajerus; text by @adaesthete
“The space feels balanced between masculine and feminine qualities,” says architect @robinnanneystudio of the intimate residence in Pasadena, California, she shares with her husband, @christophernormanprojects, also an architect. “And the view from the bed in the mornings is a combination of gingko leaves and pure, abstract form—it’s like we’re living in a painting.” This oasis-like home, constructed in 1976, is an enthusiastic exercise in Eastern-influenced modernism. Conrad Buff III and Donald Hensman, its architects, were students of Greene and Greene—the illustrious firm that has been credited with California’s introduction to the Arts and Crafts movement. Here, in Pasadena, Buff and Hensman have embraced a Japanese aesthetic and their warm brand of modernism. Inside, the home breathes. Light is abundant. The interiors are fashioned from redwood (with the “tongue and groove” method), featuring oakwood floors and teakwood details. These wood materials can also be seen in the furniture, which the architects had installed into the structure including the bed, the desks, and the tables as well as the cabinets and the shelves. The homeowners collaborated with @carolinefeiffer, the interior designer, to decorate—and soften—the interiors. Caroline contributed plush and other elements to create a sense of comfort that wouldn’t emasculate the architecture (and the furniture). Visit the link in our profile to see more inside the home. Photo by @emilyberl; text by @elizabethquinnbrown; styled by @carolinefeiffer
Architecture, both new and old, defines city skylines and has a lasting impact on our perceived memory of a place. And while historic architecture has its own charm, it's no secret that, at its best, modern architecture has the ability to be inspiring. Examples abound, including almost any building designed by figures such as Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, Santiago Calatrava, and Frank Gehry, among others. Their buildings, much like a force of nature, have the ability to transform a neighborhood (almost always for the better). Many refer to this as the Bilbao effect, a term coined after a Frank Gehry–designed Guggenheim museum helped turn around Bilbao's economy in Spain. Yet economy boost aside, what about when these modern marvels are built on or within the existing buildings themselves? While it's not the norm, there are times when architects decide (mainly due to preservation), that instead of building around or in place of historic structures, it's in fact better to build in or atop the original foundation. When these two worlds of old and new come together, the result can be awe-inspiring. Sant Fransesc Church, for example, was originally built in the early 18th century by Franciscan priests, but was abandoned by the 19th century. By 2000, the structure was in hideous shape. That was until architect David Closes redesigned it, adding, among other elements, an eye-catching entrance to the building, pictured here. Visit the link in our profile to see other great examples of when historic and modern architecture come together. Photo by @jordisurrocabcn; text by @iamnickmafi
Fashion designer Rebecca de Ravenel (@rderavenel) relocated her life and business from the Bahamas to Los Angeles four years ago. “I was looking for something that would be a bit of an escape,” she says of her search for this house. “What’s amazing about it is that it’s surrounded by windows. You wake up in the morning and there’s that California light.” The free-flowing living and dining areas are filled with peppy floral fabrics, an antique wicker dining set with heart-backed chairs, and striped @madelineweinrib rugs. “I originally wanted the house to be very white,” she says. “I tried, but I just seem to be incapable. I keep adding and layering.” Among the myriad cases in point are antique iron peacocks from her family home in the Bahamas, little black vases found in Burma, and a Man Ray photograph of her great-grandmother Baba d’Erlanger. In the living area, a table from @charlesjacobsen sits atop a Madeline Weinrib rug, and a poppy print de Ravenel created is reimagined on a sofa cushion, lamp shade, table linens, and even china. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the home. Photo by @amyneunsinger; text by @janekeltnerdev
When tasked with conjuring a dream home for a vivacious almost-billionaire superstar, #AD100 designer @martynbullard obliged with a design scheme that is equal parts sparkle and sumptuousness. On the more glittery end of the spectrum are the white lacquer-and-acrylic grand piano in his client, makeup tycoon @kyliejenner’s monochromatic, Old/New Hollywood living room; the gold-leafed ceiling of the dining room; vintage Lucite furniture by Charles Hollis Jones; and reflective wall coverings galore. On the plush side of the equation, Bullard deployed carpets of Patagonian shearling, alpaca, and silk; snow leopard–patterned velvet on the vintage Milo Baughman barstools in the lounge; and fur bedcovers. In the lavish family room, pictured here, Jenner and her guests can take a swing on a @jimzivic hammock from @ralphpucciint suspended from the ceiling while enjoying treats from custom cocktail tables with cutouts for ice, champagne, and caviar. @bowerstudios mirrors from @thefutureperfect flank the fireplace and the marble side tables are by @kellywearstler. “The look is glamorous but totally inviting. Kylie loves to have people over, and there’s nothing so precious that you can’t stand, jump, or dance on it,” Bullard explains of the decorative mix. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the home. Photo by @thefacinator; text by @mayer.rus; styled by @lawrenhowell
"Pink is unapologetically pretty and old-fashioned, in the best way," says @toryburch, who has expanded her lettuceware collection (a collaboration with Dodie Thayer) to include a pale, rosy colorway. Those pieces, along with raffia place mats and hand-painted platters, are among the new additions to her home line, all of which now regularly grace the table at Burch's Antigua house, pictured here. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the updated collection. Photo by @noagriffel; text by @janekeltnerdev
“Fourteen million,” jokes actress Maggie Gyllenhaal (@mgyllenhaal) about the number of fireplaces in her and husband Peter Sarsgaard’s bright Brooklyn brownstone. “We have 14 million fireplaces.” The actual number is seven, but even if the effortlessly cool family had only one hearth in their four-story home, which they purchased in 2006, the space would feel endlessly warm. Or, as Sarsgaard puts it, “There are lots of places to curl up with a book.” Tucked into a sleepy T-shaped street in Park Slope (a Brooklyn neighborhood known for its stroller traffic and laid-back restaurants), the brownstone, with its high ceilings and southern exposure, was an instant hit with the creative couple. The quiet block gave them Sesame Street vibes, and when they first looked at it, Gyllenhaal was pregnant with the couple’s eldest daughter. Since then, another daughter has joined the family, adding to the home’s all-over family feel. “When we walked into this house, it really felt like a home to us,” says Gyllenhaal. “The light is beautiful and the rooms feel airy because the ceilings are unusually high.” And though the pair worked with architect @elizabeth_roberts_architecture and designer John Erik Karkula, they’ve made the 3,600-square-foot space all their own. In their entryway, the pair stand beneath a iron chandelier Sarsgaard bought from an antiques shop on Rivington Street in Manhattan that was owned by a woman from Buenos Aires. “I would just go in there to make small talk, and I actually just bought it at a certain point as a way of saying thank you for all the conversation,” Sarsgaard says. Gyllenhaal teases: “She was almost 80, but Peter was in love with her.” Visit the link in our profile to see inside the couple’s home. Photo by @gievesanderson; text by @julievadnal
“You have to roll with the punches in New York,” globe-trotting writer and fashion-world insider @derekblasberg writes of buying his first apartment. “Could I have ever predicted my dream house would be on the Upper East Side? No way. I ended up here because two things changed in my early 30s: First, I met @nickbrown, my longtime boyfriend, who grew up in the ’hood. After we decided to buy a place together, he opened my eyes to local charms, like strolls in Central Park; coffees at quaint, overpriced cafés; and quiet night sounds that didn’t feature bar fights and sirens. And second, on the UES this kind of apartment was, quite simply, less expensively priced per square foot than similar ones in Chelsea, the West Village, and parts of Brooklyn...Contracts signed, we assembled our dream team: architectural designers @atelierarmbruster and @marinadaytondesign and decorator @virginiatupker. Things moved swiftly because our design directive was clear: a classic New York co-op (the building, a few steps from Central Park, was built in the 1920s) layered in youthful modernism... I had an incredible art mentor: mega dealer @larrygagosian, whom I’ve worked with for half a decade.” In the dining room, two Richard Prince @instagram prints hang on the far wall, while a painting by Nate Lowman hangs to the left and one by John Currin to the right. Three @humblematter ceramic sculpture sit atop an extension table by @virginiatupker, and the Medici rattan pedestal and vase in the corner are by @ateliervime. To see more of the home, visit the link in our profile. Photo by @gievesanderson; text by @derekblasberg

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